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Thread: How do you price your clients project?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Question How do you price your clients project?

    Hi all,

    I am thinking of starting a freelancing career, I have skills in HTML, CSS, JS, AJAX, JSON, PHP, and MySQL. I know the basics, and I know how to work my way around projects.

    My question is, how do you price a project? If I am just starting out what would be a good fixed or hourly price? Are there any methods other than fixed or hourly? What does the price depend on?

    So it would be clear, I am interested in building web app. not do small or minor fixed, I want to do a whole website. And from where can I start to get jobs?

    Any recommendations are welcome,
    Thank you for your time ...
    FarrisFahad
    Be the change you want to see in the world

  2. #2
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    This is a great question and I'd love to hear from others who also do freelancing.

    From personal experience, I would definitely suggest an hourly price for website creation or any project that may have lots of changes/updates. I remember when I first started doing web work on the side, most of my clients were friends or family. So I would try to give them a break by giving them a fixed price.

    Bad idea. Of course if you allow people to take advantage of that they will. So that's exactly what would happen. People always underestimate how much time it's going to take to make changes, revisions, etc. And development (websites and even apps) is so subjective there are always going to be updates/changes that weren't necessarily in the scope.

    I don't have a set price. It really depends on the work and how involved. But I will give them an hourly price (let's just say $100/hour). I will also estimate the amount of hours upfront so they have a ballpark idea. And if an updates will go beyond what I estimated we will address that.

    I also collect the first 50% upfront -- especially if it's someone I just met (for example I meet a lot of people at various local WordPress meetups, etc.)

    As far as getting jobs, you can try some of the online sites like freelancer, oDesk, etc. And you can look at existing jobs to get an idea for what people are charging for their work. A lot of the jobs are public. The nice thing about working for freelancer, Elance, etc. is both the buyer and the coder have some level of protection through the site.

    You can also set your terms for how you want to be paid as well. So that's another bonus.

  3. #3
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    Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England
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    Yeah it's best not to set rigid pricing, quote everyone's website separately and subjectively, but put an hourly value on your time to let people know you don't want to have your time wasted.

    If people realise you are not a "cheap" person they'll take you more seriously. Never lower your prices in web design, it just attracts people who think they need a website as an afterthought to their business but who are not willing to do the marketing and put forth the effort.

    They think a website is a machine in to which they put one dollar in and get two dollars out.

    You don't want those people as clients, I've been there a lot in the past and this is what happens:

    -You're always busy
    -You have lots of paperwork
    -You don't make any money

    As already stated, it's def a good idea to get a deposit. Even if it is not a large down payment, the act of your client handing over money up front helps them psychologically commit to the business arrangement. If you can get them to sign something with a pen, or write down ideas, contributions etc, they'll feel more actively involved and that "this is really happening".

    My mistake in the past was to set low pricing when I should have insisted on higher fees and a screening process. I now screen people using a guided tour and introduction to digital marketing using PDFs, video content etc. If I know clients have consumed all the information/FAQs/videos I give them and are still interested, it (usually) means they take the work seriously enough to pay the price I ask.

    Remember what it is you are giving someone when you build a website. It is a marketing tool to help them drive turnover and increase profit. You are giving them a tool to use the way a workman uses tools to complete a task. As a web design and internet marketer, your tools are are helping your client drill better holes, make better cuts, measure correctly...

    I quoted someone 1000 a couple of weeks for what I called a "bells and whistles WordPress site". Then I quoted him a lower price for static HTML which was half the price. It's always good to stack your products/services next to one another and highlight price to make a clear distinction between the quality of the work you offer. If you don't put a high value on it yourself, neither will they. But as I said before, I don't give any prices until I know what they want and what their budget is.

    And one other thing, when you quote someone that hourly rate, remember it is not just one hour of your time they are getting. It might be one hour plus ten years experience. Just because it comes easy to you to perform a certain tasks, don't let people fool you into cutting your prices. Set your prices high and you'll be giving yourself a reputation to live up to. Good clients = good work.

    Additional info: I never give people a price based on how many pages their website has. The price is based on the overall project
    Last edited by Darren; 02-25-2014 at 03:26 PM.

  4. #4
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    Hi Darren,

    I liked your idea on high pricing that attract good clients, because people who will pay low price wither it's hourly or fixed, they are not looking for professional work.

    What about pricing projects by the number of pages, for example:
    - 8 PHP pages = $200 / page * 8 = $1600
    - 2 Static pages = $50 / page * 2 = $100
    - Add Javascript 200 lines = $350 / 100 line * 2 = $700
    - Other request, PayPal = $100
    - Additional hours for editing = $100 / hr

    Do you think that this kind of pricing would work? If not what would be the problem?

    Thank you Lisa, and Darren ...
    Be the change you want to see in the world

  5. #5
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    I honestly would not base your pricing on how many pages you create. Your pricing should be on what your work is worth to a client and what their budget is.

  6. #6
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    First qualify they even have the budget before you get too much down on paper. If they do a signed statement of work between two parties can help with "scope creep". The statement of work protects you but also sets correct expectations for the client. It can be referenced should any disputes occur.
    Twitter: SuperTekBoy

  7. #7

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    There are good suggestions here. Initially, you may not get the jobs or the money you want but you have to start from somewhere. As your business develops you get better ideas and you know what project is good and what is just paying the bills. By the way, you have to think about the client as well. When you are quoting an hourly rate it may be good idea to estimate the total hours required for the project as well. You need to be flexible too because some people would want to know how much the total cost be. So, be prepared to quote for the project as well.

    A good way of finding extra business on top of the freelance sites is to contact some larger companies and tell them you exist. You may offer them your services as a contractor or offer them commission on the works they pass onto you. Talk to as many people as you can and let them know what you can do. Many people don't want a particular job. Many of them prefer to pass the job to a fellow designer rather than sending the client off their way.

    Forums are good places to advertise your services as well. You could either buy banner ads or keep active in the forum. For example, I prefer to work with someone within my close community. I would first check my favorite forums for service providers.
    Last edited by TCI; 04-05-2014 at 02:36 PM.
    Talking about car insurance prices, savings, insurers and coverage

  8. #8
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    A bit difficult task to pricing clients project but I do according to the requirements of clients lets say design+development

    or only development or design. I decide on the basis of that.

  9. #9
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    Great price planning

    Quote Originally Posted by FarrisFahad View Post
    Hi Darren,

    I liked your idea on high pricing that attract good clients, because people who will pay low price wither it's hourly or fixed, they are not looking for professional work.

    What about pricing projects by the number of pages, for example:
    - 8 PHP pages = $200 / page * 8 = $1600
    - 2 Static pages = $50 / page * 2 = $100
    - Add Javascript 200 lines = $350 / 100 line * 2 = $700
    - Other request, PayPal = $100
    - Additional hours for editing = $100 / hr

    Do you think that this kind of pricing would work? If not what would be the problem?

    Thank you Lisa, and Darren ...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Germany
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    13

    Default

    Lots of good points made here. I have had lots of problems with pricing myself. The average person doesnt know how much work it takes to design a really good and professional website. They take it for granted. They see the finished product or service and feel that it happens magically and since you didnt physically expend any energy, they think it was easy. I had a client who wanted the same website design as crefflo dollar's website and when i quoted him the price (for example $1000), he came back telling me he could find someone else to do it for $400. I simply told him to go ahead with the other person. So bottom line is you should know how much your prices are and stick with it. There are people out there who do websites for less and it shows in their work. So if you know you can build a professional site, then charge what you know it takes to get the best work done for your client.

  11. #11

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    Sites like freelancer and elance has made it easy to find good developers. I use them all the time and notice that it is highly competitive. The pricing you mentioned may not get you many projects. You may want to check a real project to get some understanding.

  12. #12
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    Based on a firm set of criteria, it's not difficult to price-out a project at a firm price. If you've underestimated the time, you lose - but you learn from that experience too, so it won't happen again.

    Everyone should figure out what there charge-out-rate to be in business actually is. That said, whether your charge out rate is $35 an hour or $135 per hour, if you can secure contracts based on that rate, you should be happy.

    But never (unless the walls are caving in) lowball a price just to get the job. Rarely does anyone ever win in that type of scenario - the client or the developer, IMO.
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